Football Management

Commentary on the management of over 160 English football clubs by Dr John Beech, winner of the FSF Writer of the Year Award 2009/10 Twitter: @JohnBeech Curator of Scoop.it! Football Finance

Shares, not shirts!

Posted by John Beech on August 29, 2011

A couple of postings back (see Chester revisited) I threatened some more thoughts on my revisiting the Report of the Committee on Football, aka The Chester Report, published in 1968.  This is the first of two, and focuses on how the funding of clubs by fans has changed in the past 40+ years.

Today clubs have three main revenue streams – broadcasting rights (effectively non-existent in the sixties), commercial revenues through sponsorship (banned in the sixties, in spite of Jimmy Hill’s attempts to get the Talbot logo onto Coventry City’s shirts) and merchandising (then as unimaginable as being allowed to buy a School First Team or Prefect’s tie if you weren’t entitled to it – shirts were only fit to grace the backs of players), and direct revenues through ticketing, and to a lesser extent matchday programmes.  Among the direct revenues in those days were donations from supporters clubs – a to-a-large-extent, although certainly not entirely, forgotten form of fans financing clubs.

Chester was able to write back then:

The financial position of a club is determined by several factors: gate receipts in relation to operating expenses (players’ wages, administration etc.); contributions from supporters clubs, sweepstakes etc.; transfer fees; and distributions from the Football League and the Football Association.

The order in which the factors are listed is interesting, and to some extent implies their significance.  Under the heading ‘Miscellaneous Income (including Supporters’ Club contribution‘, the Chester Report states (and it’s worth quoting the full text):

Most clubs obtain a good deal of money from the operation of sweepstakes, bingo, raffles, and a variety of “gambling” devices [sic]. These are sometimes run by the club or a body directly under its control, but more often they are run by the Supporters’ club.  From the published accounts (which by no means tell the full story) income of this kind totalled £4¼ million and provided over 90 per cent of all additional funds to League clubs in 1963-1966.  Its significance varied in different leagues.  It was least important, absolutely and relatively, in the First Division.  In the Third Division, however, it compensated for some 80 per cent of gross operating deficits in 1963-1966 and for roughly two thirds of such deficits in the Fourth Division.  Indeed these two lower divisions, where team and administrative expenses and wages alone exceed total gate receipts, could not have been sustained without money from this source.  The total in the Third and Fourth Divisions during these three seasons alone was £2¼ million as against gate receipts of some £5 million.  In other words, Supporters’ clubs, bingo etc. contributed in the ratio of nearly £1 to every £2 taken at the gate.  In addition such clubs may make contributions to the well-being of their football clubs which do not appear in the accounts, e.g. the improving of terracing and ground facilities.

The importance of Supporters’ clubs for the financial survival of the lower division clubs , quite apart from their social role in canalising the deep attachment which many supporters feel for their local clubs, cannot be exaggerated.  It is most disturbing therefore, that these contributions were on a slightly declining trend in Divisions 2, 3 and 4 during 1963-66.  Should this trend ever become more pronounced, the financial viability of many of the lower clubs would be in serious doubt.

(To allow for inflation and look at these figures by today’s standards in terms of changes in average earnings, 1968 figures should be multiplied by a little over 25.)

The importance of donations from Supporters’ Clubs is echoed in another report from the same era.  The Political and Economic Planning (PEP) report English Professional Football of June 1966 notes: “Probably only four or five First Division clubs depend on [donations from Supporters Clubs] to a marked degree, yet in the lower divisions many clubs would be unable to exist unless these funds were forthcoming.  During 1964-5 in at least five League clubs, supporters’ donations represented some 60 per cent of the parent club’s total income.”  I find that staggering, especially when viewed from today’s perspective.  Unfortunately the report does not name the five clubs.

There are of course, especially in lower Leagues, some clubs today where the income directly from fans is a key element in the club’s budget.  What is different from the sixties though is that fans would not be prepared to simply subsidise a club owned by a ‘benefactor’ (or maybe in some cases they would and do) without some say in how the club was run.

Direct financial support of a club by a fan today includes the purchasing of endless variants of shirts.  Does it actually matter if this revenue stream has replaced donations through a Supporters’ Club?  I would argue very strongly that it does.  At least if the donation was through a Supporters’ Club, fans had a strong voice, if no significant power.  By seeing income shift from Supporter’s Club donations to the sale of shirts, the fans’ voice has been effectively individualised and thus virtually silenced.  Well-intentioned though recent boycotts of merchandising have been, they have had relatively little impact on club boards.

To regain a voice, and gain a say in how their club is run, fans need to gain stakeholder power through share ownership.  The next time you contemplate spending £40 on the new alternative away shirt, or for some reason feel embarrassed by wearing a shirt with last year’s sponsor’s logo (personally I’m embarassed at wearing any sponsor’s logo – remember, I’m a Pompey fan, and not so long ago we were, for some inexplicable reason, sponsored by Ty, the manufacturer of Beanie Babies), consider the option of instead donating £40 to your Supporters’ Trust war-chest!

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3 Responses to “Shares, not shirts!”

  1. It’s very interesting to see some historical context of how supporters have funded clubs, in England at least.

    I’ve been very surprised recently at how controversial the question of share ownership by the supporters trust (DFCSS) has been at Dundee FC. I had thought that the overwhelming majority of supporters would agree that it was a good thing, especially at a club that’s been taken into administration twice in 10 years by benefactors, but it seems not to be as clear cut as I’d thought.

  2. [...] intitola proprio “Shares, not shirts! ”, con una sorta di slogan, un recentissimo post del prof. John Beech, uno dei massimi esperti [...]

  3. [...] Shares not shirts! John Beech – Football Management [...]

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